Virginia Slims and the Kool-Aid Man by Claire Collins

Oil of Olay’s ads in the late 70’s were so effective that I as a 7 or 8-year-old, thought I needed to use their product. From the commercials, women must all succumb to this horrible tragedy called “wrinkles” which made them look old. My mom got a sample size of the amazing beauty fluid and I used it until it was gone. She wouldn’t buy me a full bottle and over time I forgot to worry about wrinkles.

I was about 5 when my parents quit smoking. It’s hard to believe I remember so much of it so well since I was so young but it was pretty traumatic for me.  I remember lying on the floorboard of the car. Yes – seatbelts were optional back then, and I was very young since I could fit on the floorboard. Yet I remember clearly lying on the floorboard because I was trying to breathe. It was winter and both of my parents were smoking with the windows rolled up. Yuck. But I do remember that my mother smoked Virginia Slims.

I remember so well because they would include these totally cool and amazing Book of Days calendars with each carton of cigarettes. My mother always ended up with lots of extras and I was a voracious reader so she would give them to me. I think I memorized most of them. To me, it was just like getting a prize in a cereal box. That was strong advertising.

I began smoking at 15 and  smoked for 22 years. It’s been 3 years now since I quit.  I always did like that slogan: “You’ve come a long way baby”. Thankfully, all of that Oil of Olay has kept my skin very youthful looking and wrinkle free despite all of that smoking.

What advertising really impacted your life? Not just the ones that you remember, because we all know about the Kool-Aid man, OH YEAH! and that our bologna has a first name (It’s O-S-C-A-R), but the ads that really sunk in to your habits and life? What do you think about the images that children today are exposed to?

Claire Collins is the author of Images of Betrayal  and Fate and Destiny

About these ads

2 Comments

Filed under fun

2 responses to “Virginia Slims and the Kool-Aid Man by Claire Collins

  1. Sherrie Hansen

    I like this – although I’m sad the cigarette ads of old were so enticing. Hopefully we can start using our powers of persuasion for good – to sell books that inspire, entertain and build people up.

  2. Movie ads were probably the only ads that enticed me because my parents didn’t mention those. Sibling rivalry saved me from the allure of ads. Having gone through several incidents where my older brother nagged for months to get Buster Brown shoes (and other items) he totally hated after they bought them for him, they made sure I learned from my brother’s follies. And since my brother was usually held up as the most intelligent of all beings, I wanted at least in this one thing, to be smarter than he. So I ended up going to movies I didn’t like but would never admit that I didn’t like them, The Music Man being a film of that group I remember most. I do think for most young people, peer pressure is a stronger persuader than ad enticement.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s